The Torch of True Meaning

The Torch of True Meaning

This new translation (printed by KTD Publications in 2015) of the classic text, The Torch of True Meaning (ཕྱག་ཆེན་སྔོན་འགྲོ་བཞི་སྦྱོར་དང་དངོས་གཞིའི་ཁྲིད་རིམ་མདོར་བསྡུས་ངེས་དོན་སྒྲོན་མེ།), by the great master and scholar Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye gives clear and concise instructions on the preliminary and main practices of mahamudra meditation. But it does not only teach mahamudra: this book describes vividly what is necessary for any meditation practice. It is presented here in a new translation that includes the previously unpublished final chapter of Jamgön Kongtrul’s work, a brief yet inspiring description of the actual practice of mahamudra.

Note: The traditional practice text for the Karma Kamtsang preliminary practices, commented in this book, is published separately as The Chariot that Travels the Noble Path.

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The Chariot that Travels the Noble Path

The Chariot that Travels the Noble Path

The Chariot that Travels the Noble Path (སྒྲུབ་བརྒྱུད་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་ཕྲེང་བ་ཀརྨ་ཀཾ་ཚང་རྟོགས་པའི་དོན་རྒྱུད་ལས་བྱུང་བའི་གསུང་དྲི་མ་མེད་པ་རྣམས་བཀོད་ནས་ཞལ་འདོན་རྒྱུན་ཁྱེར་གྱི་རིམ་པ་འཕགས་ལམ་འགྲོད་པའི་ཤིང་རྟ།) is  the standard practice text for the mahamudra preliminaries in the Karma Kamtsang tradition, composed by the Ninth Gyalwang Karmapa, Wangchuk Dorje. Presented here is a new edition prepared by the Seventeenth Gyalwang Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, who wrote a new lineage supplication and made other edits in the guru yoga practice to bring it closer to the original sources.

This practice should be done only by people who have received the appropriate empowerment, transmission, and instruction from a qualified guru.

The commentary for the ngondro practices featured in this ebook is published seperately as The Torch of True Meaning.

Ngondro for Our Current Day also gives instructions on the short ngondro practice by the Seventeenth Gyalwang Karmapa. Though the visualizations are slightly different, the general principals are the same as for this practice.

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Chenrezik: For the Benefit of All Beings

Chenrezik: For the Benefit of All Beings

One of the most highly revered living masters of the Karma Kagyu lineage, Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche offers here a detailed explanation of the Chenrezik practice, based on For the Benefit of All Beings as Vast as the Sky (Drodon khakhyabma), a text composed by Thangtong Gyalpo. Drawing on decades of experience guiding Western students and with the sparkling clarity that is so typical of his teachings, in this book Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche offers students all that they need to plant their own seeds of awakening.

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Sadhana of Chenrezik

Sadhana of Chenrezik

The Chenrezik practice, For the Benefit of All Beings as Vast as the Sky (ཐུགས་རྗེ་ཆེན་པོའི་སྒོམ་བཟླས་འགྲོ་དོན་མཁའ་ཁྱབ་མ་བཞུགས་སོ།།), composed by Thangtong Gyalpo.

See also:

The Chenrezik: For the Benefit of All Beings by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche

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Ngondro for Our Current Day

Ngondro for Our Current Day

The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa compiled a condensed ngondro text especially for those who wish to complete their preliminary practices in the context of busy work lives. It was published earlier as a seperate ebook: Brief Recitations for the Four Preliminary Practices.

In this succinct teaching presented in 2006 by the Gyalwang Karmapa in Bodhgaya, India, he guides students through the details of the visualizations of Refuge, Vajrasattva purification, and Mandala offerings — often punctuated with his good humor. The commentary does not include the practice of Guru Yoga, which according to the Gyalwang Karmapa’s advice should be done only with blessing and instructions of one’s own guru.

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Commentaries on the Four-Session Guru Yoga

A Collection of Commentaries on the Four-Session Guru Yoga

Guru yoga is essential for the realization of mahamudra, and in the Karma Kagyu lineage, the primary guru yoga practiced is the Four-Session Guru Yoga by the Eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje. This volume presents newly rediscovered instructions for this practice by the Fifth Shamar Könchok Yenlak and the Ninth Karmapa Wangchuk Dorje along with the more well-known commentaries by Karma Chakme, Karmay Khenchen Rinchen Dargye, and the Fifteenth Karmapa Khakhyap Dorje. These texts give clear guidance that, when accompanied by instruction from a qualified master, will help practitioners develop the profound realization of devotion mahamudra.

Commentaries by the Fifth Shamar Könchok Yenlak, the Ninth Karmapa Wangchuk Dorje, Karma Chakme, Karmay Khenchen Rinchen Dargye, and the Fifteenth Karmapa Khakhyap Dorje.

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The Seven Points of Mind Training

The Seven Points of Mind Training

ཐེག་པ་ཆེན་པོའི་གདམས་ངག་བློ་སྦྱོང་དོན་བདུན་མ།
Though from beginningless samsara, all beings have assiduously chased after outer objects to procure happiness and remove suffering, these hopes remain unfulfilled. Knowing that one’s mind is the real source of all happiness and suffering, the Buddha taught countless means to tame one’s mind. With the Mind Training instructions, one uses any and all tribulations as means to gather the accumulations and remove obscurations. Merely adopting these mental attitudes allows one to use negativities for enrichment. They are pith instructions of the Mahayana.

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The Ganges Mahamudra

The Ganges Mahamudra

The glorious Naropa was an eminent scholar who had consummated his understanding of the oceans of inner and outer philosophical tenets. Still, with no concern for his body or life, he endured intense hardships in order to receive introduction to the naked nature of mind, free of obscurations, which is the basis for all of samsara and nirvana. This pleased his master, Jetsun Tilopa, who sang him a song of mahamudra, an introduction to the essence of mind itself. This song became known as The Ganges Mahamudra (ཕྱག་ཆེན་གངྒཱ་མ།) and should be cherished by all beings who wish to avoid suffering and obtain happiness.

This is the version of the root text referenced by Shamar Konchok Yenlak in his commentary on the text.

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The Practice of Chöd

The Practice of Chöd

The Practice of Chöd — Simple Veces from a Prophecy in a Dream (རྨི་ལམ་ལུང་བསྟན་གྱི་བསྟབ་པ་ཚིགས་བཅད་འདོན་བདེ་བར་བཀོད་པ་བཞུགས་སོ།) features the most concise and, at the same time, the most popular sadhana of Chöd used for daily recitation in the Karma Kamtsang tradition. It was composed by Karma Chakme (who called himself Raga Asya) – a famous, prolific student of the 6th Shamarpa Chökyi Wangchuk – and, as the title suggests, it first appeared to him as a prophecy in a dream.

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Embodying Compassion in Buddhist Art

Embodying Compassion in Buddhist Art

Embodying Compassion in Buddhist Art: Image, Pilgrimage, Practice, organized by the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center of Vassar College in 2015, was the first transcultural exhibition in America solely devoted to the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. The accompanying catalogue, written by Karen Lucic, traces the story of this important figure, who emerged from ancient India to become a venerated deity throughout Asia. As one who leads others to enlightenment, this bodhisattva exemplifies limitless compassion, a fundamental ideal in Mahayana Buddhism. The beautifully illustrated catalogue features over sixty Indian, Nepalese, Tibetan, Chinese, and Japanese representations of Avalokiteshvara.

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